This Week in Foodservice

jStieglerJerry StieglerThis Week in Foodservice provides a high-level summary of the economic data, financial news, menu updates and numerous other statistical packages and developments that impact foodservice operators, consultants, dealers, manufacturers, reps and service agents. In his weekly blog, Jerry Stiegler aggregates key industry data through his infamous Green Sheet and provides some brief analysis that will help foodservice professionals navigate the information. Jerry is a long-time member of the foodservice industry, whose experience includes working for Restaurants & Institutions magazine and FE&S.

This Week in Foodservice: BWW’s Taco Chain Expansion; Effects of Minimum Wage Examined, YUM China on its Own and More

Stories worth a second look: Boston Globe columnist takes a look at effects of minimum wage; the foodservice industry added over 9,000 employees in October; Buffalo Wild Wings has major expansion plans for its taco chain; YUM’s China operation is officially a separate company; and the NFL’s declining TV ratings are getting the blame for soft sales at some chains. Plus, we have the latest comp store sales for over a dozen chains.

This Week in Foodservice: Amazon to Expand with Curbside Grocery Pickup; September Sales Show Confidence; and Noise Drowns out Food Taste

News worthy of a second take:Restaurant sales continued to roll on in September according to the Commerce Department. Knapp-Track continues to show weak sales at casual dining chains. Amazon is going the brick-and-mortar route with the internet giant announcing they are moving into the c-store business and opening drive-in locations for the pickup of groceries ordered online. A study shows that noise can make food taste bad.

This Week in Foodservice: Restaurants a Bright Spot in Declining August Sales, Higher Menu Prices Slowing Lunch Traffic, Consumer Shift Toward Smaller Chains

Weekly news that’s worth another look: While retail sales declined in August, restaurants were a bright spot; The NPD Group says higher menu prices are a factor in slowing lunch traffic; the spread between grocery store prices and foodservice prices continues; consumers may be shifting from major chains to smaller chains and independents.