Foodservice Issues

Spotlights the challenges and opportunities that impact the application of foodservice equipment and supplies in the real world including green and energy efficiency concerns, foodservice equipment concerns, the impact of technology on foodservice, and the state of the foodservice economy.

Consultants' Roundtable

Foodservice designers share insights on kitchen trends, the impact of off-premise dining and other shifts in the foodservice industry.

Secrets to Optimizing Kitchen Workflow

“Back-of-the-house workflow — receiving, storage, prep, production, service — is ultimately driven by the menu. However, the design of these areas is a well-coordinated dance. The size and plan of one space has an impact on the other,” says James (Jim) Richards Jr., president of PES Design Group, Sarasota, Fla.

Action Stations Sizzle

Theater, transparency, freshness, engagement, customization — foodservice customers today want it all. Action stations occupy the unique position to satisfy those demands, bringing prep, assembly and/or active cooking out from the back of the house and into the front-of-the-house spotlight. Coast to coast, in market segments from corporate and campus dining to K-12 schools and healthcare facilities, serveries now sizzle with stations built around myriad concepts. Action stations give customers diverse choices, the ability to get what they want how they want it, and a bird’s-eye view of their food prepared or assembled just for them.

Right-Sizing the Kitchen

With the movement toward ever-decreasing kitchen sizes, when does small become too small? Is efficiency sometimes sacrificed as a result of reducing the kitchen footprint? Or can equipment completely compensate for the reduction in space? When designing a smaller kitchen, finding the sweet spot requires a combination of efficiency and space saving.

How to Design a Developer-Driven Restaurant

What happens when the architect wants you to design a bar and restaurant, but the chef hasn’t even been chosen? Not knowing the menu can be a foodservice designer’s worst nightmare and it’s becoming a bigger reality these days, especially as more urban developers get into the restaurant game. The fact that menus, chefs and concepts now change faster than ever only adds to the dilemma and requires designs be more flexible to withstand the tests of time.

Tiny Kitchens Force Efficiency

In a perfect world, every restaurant kitchen would have thousands of square feet of working space, contain all of the latest equipment and include an ergonomic design to maximize the flow of both staff and product through the space. But, it’s not a perfect world. Most foodservice kitchens are small — in fact, some
are downright tiny. Yet, even with small kitchens, many operators find ways to thrive.

Building Revenue and Enthusiasm for School Foodservice

The public high school in Coppell, Texas, became overcrowded when enrollment reached 3,500 students in grades 9 through 12. In response, the Coppell Independent School District (ISD) moved 1,000 ninth graders to an existing middle school building in August of 2018 and renamed it Coppell High School Ninth Grade Campus. Meanwhile, Coppell ISD built a new middle school across town for all sixth, seventh and eighth graders, called Middle School West.

Avoiding Dish Room Afterthought

If the kitchen is the heart of a foodservice operation, dish rooms are the lungs of the facility — dirty serviceware in, clean ware out. Despite their importance, however, dish rooms are often the last design element considered when building or renovating a restaurant or noncommercial dining space.

Jeffco Public Schools Reform K-8 Dining

Population growth in the communities feeding into Jefferson County Public Schools (Jeffco), the second largest school district in Colorado, led to a new school for students in kindergarten to eighth grades: Three Creeks K-8 School in Arvada, Colo. Project goals for the dining program included creating an inviting school meal environment and providing efficient work space for foodservice staff.

Campus Kosher

Kosher-certified kitchens, which must follow super strict ingredient and preparation guidelines, can appeal to anyone with an interest in where their food comes from, how it’s prepared and by whom. University-level dining program administrators also understand how kosher adds to campus inclusivity in the form of food.

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